RED CLOCKS cover SMALL.png

Little, Brown
January 16, 2018

The Borough Press (UK)
March 8, 2018

Translations forthcoming in French, Italian, Polish, Spanish, & Turkish




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”Move over Atwood, Leni Zumas's RED CLOCKS is a gender-roaring tour de force. The bodies of women in RED CLOCKS are each the site of resistance and revolution. I screamed out loud. I pumped my first in the air. And I remembered how hope is forged from the ground up, through the bodies of women who won't be buried.”
LIDIA YUKNAVITCH, THE BOOK OF JOAN

“Hilarious, terrifying, and masterful—RED CLOCKS reflects the horror and absurdity of our political landscape with a brilliance that ensures the book's timelessness. It's as riotously fun as it is chilling. Zumas has produced a poignant, wickedly sharp classic.” 
ALISSA NUTTING, MADE FOR LOVE

“The women in this suspenseful book resist. They will not be circumscribed. The effect on the reader is cathartic.”         
CHRISTINE SCHUTT, PROSPEROUS FRIENDS

“In bristling sentences, Leni Zumas shows girls and women defying the excruciating restrictions imposed by both law and culture. RED CLOCKS is unabashedly political and fiercely humane.”         
EMILY FRIDLUND, HISTORY OF WOLVES

“This novel is not due to arrive until January 16, 2018, but it’s so urgent and important and unforgettable that I have to tell you about it now so you’ll have plenty of time to clear your schedules. Written in a language entirely unique and inventive, Red Clocks weaves together the lives of five women to create a story that is equal parts prophecy, allegory, and human history. ...In one of her expedition journal entries, Eivør writes, “[i]f wrecked in this vessel, we wreck together.” This line—written from the belly of a ship—binds not only the women in the novel, but all women, past and present. Zumas’s novel is a reckoning, a warning, and nothing short of a miracle. Don’t miss it.“                            
AMY JO BURNS in PLOUGHSHARES

“The novel's central focus is on the internal legislation that governs motherhood—not the laws enacted by Congress, but the joys and recriminations every woman feels regarding pregnancy and motherhood. As the Wife, Mender, Daughter, and Biographer show—in utterly compelling, distinct voices—there's no simple narrative governing the choice to carry, birth, abort or adopt a child. Each choice is fraught, and intimately tied to a self-determination constantly under threat not just from outsiders, but from our own flawed and evolving ideas of what a woman should be, or want.“
RHIANNA W., bookseller, Powells.com